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the polish flag - lines. tunic top. new fit

27,32 €
THE POLISH FLAG – LINES. TUNIC TOP. NEW FIT Attention! A new improved tunic fit.  A slim tunic with a round neckline, bust darts and cap sleeves. A longer back and rounded edges. Neckline, sleeves and the bottom finished with binding in the same color as the fabric. A large print featuring the motif of a wavy white-and-red flag. The flag in the print design is composed of a large number of fine lines which, as a result of an optical illusion, begin to wave.   The Polish Flag The Polish national colors are among the oldest in Europe. In the majority of countries, flags were established towards the end of the Age of Enlightenment, unlike in Poland where the flag’s origins date back to the Middle Ages and are connected with the history of the Polish Coat of Arms. The Eagle probably appeared in Polish noblemen’s crests during the reign of Bolesław I the Brave (PL: Bolesław Chrobry) who issued coins with the image of this bird.   It is unclear whether it was an eagle or not as there are hypotheses that it was, in fact, a peacock or a dove. It is certain, however, that the eagle appears in the Polish heraldry in the mid-12th century when it was used by Bolesław III Wrymouth (Bolesław Krzywousty) and his sons. In the 13th century, Piast Dukes began to assume the white-and-red eagle as their crests. Color selection was of two-fold origin. It is assumed that both of those colors were popular among Slavs: white was associated with water, purity, honesty and serenity, whereas red symbolized fire and was associated with energy, bravery and power. Red also meant wealth, as red dye was among the most expensive ones. The other origin is related to heraldry. Both colors take high places in heraldic seniority – white, which represents silver in heraldic metals, is second only to gold, whilst red takes the first place in the hierarchy of colors and is just after the two aforementioned metals. Another reason for choosing a white figure might have been the will to differentiate from the Czechs and Germans who used black eagles in their heraldries.  Color placement  It was also heraldry that decided on color placement. Following the principles of heraldry, knights who carried banners with their lieges’ colors placed the figure color in the top field and the background color in any other field. Red had no uniform shade in those days which was the result of using various dyes. Gradually, however, its most expensive shade, crimson, was becoming increasingly popular and from the 16th century the Polish national colors were white and crimson. The crimson  In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, one more color, navy blue, joined the two. It was inspired by two  completely separate origins. The first one was the Polish uniform, as in the 16th century the uniforms of the Hussars and Petyhorcy (Polish and Lituanian medium-armored cavalry) in crimson and navy blue were more and more common. After the reform of 1775 and substituting the old mounted units with a uniform national cavalry, crimson and navy blue uniforms with white elements were used. Chevau-légers and other units also wore uniforms in these colors. The other origin was the Kościuszko Uprising. The fact that adding navy blue to the white and red was not a reference to the Polish uniform but to the French revolution. Kościuszko, in fact, had hoped for French support and spoke about it with Gen. Charles Dumouries, hence the reference to the French tricolor. Color unification  In 1831, a decision was taken to unify the colors. There were three proposals: traditional white and crimson; white, red, and navy blue supported by the Patriots Club (Towarzystwo Patriotyczne) as those had been the colors of the Bar Confederation; and white put forward by conservatives and monarchists. It needs to be explained that white, although not accepted as the national color, was lobbied by Augustus II the Strong, whereas the conservatives proposal was associated with passing the throne of Duchy of Warsaw to Wettins. During the November Uprising, the Sejm (the Polish Parliament of that time) issued the resolution of February 7th, whereby white and crimson were recognized as the Polish national colors, in reference to the colors of the Kingdom of Poland and Grand Duchy of Lithuania. However, that did not mean abandoning the remaining configurations and during the November Uprising white-red-and-blue flags were also used. Colors and coat of arms  After regaining independence, the Sejm passed an act on August 1st, 1919, whereby the national colors and coat of arms were formalized. The issue of the shade of red to use on the national flag arose again. It was established in 1921 that it would be crimson. Six years later, however, it was changed to vermilion. It was also formalized as vermilion by an act in 1955. It was in 1980, when the Sejm of the Polish People’s Republic decided on returning to crimson. Ever since then, the flag has remained unchanged.
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THE POLISH FLAG – LINES. TUNIC TOP. NEW FIT

Attention! A new improved tunic fit. 

A slim tunic with a round neckline, bust darts and cap sleeves. A longer back and rounded edges. Neckline, sleeves and the bottom finished with binding in the same color as the fabric.

A large print featuring the motif of a wavy white-and-red flag. The flag in the print design is composed of a large number of fine lines which, as a result of an optical illusion, begin to wave.

 

The Polish Flag

The Polish national colors are among the oldest in Europe. In the majority of countries, flags were established towards the end of the Age of Enlightenment, unlike in Poland where the flag’s origins date back to the Middle Ages and are connected with the history of the Polish Coat of Arms. The Eagle probably appeared in Polish noblemen’s crests during the reign of Bolesław I the Brave (PL: Bolesław Chrobry) who issued coins with the image of this bird.
 
It is unclear whether it was an eagle or not as there are hypotheses that it was, in fact, a peacock or a dove. It is certain, however, that the eagle appears in the Polish heraldry in the mid-12th century when it was used by Bolesław III Wrymouth (Bolesław Krzywousty) and his sons. In the 13th century, Piast Dukes began to assume the white-and-red eagle as their crests. Color selection was of two-fold origin. It is assumed that both of those colors were popular among Slavs: white was associated with water, purity, honesty and serenity, whereas red symbolized fire and was associated with energy, bravery and power. Red also meant wealth, as red dye was among the most expensive ones. The other origin is related to heraldry. Both colors take high places in heraldic seniority – white, which represents silver in heraldic metals, is second only to gold, whilst red takes the first place in the hierarchy of colors and is just after the two aforementioned metals. Another reason for choosing a white figure might have been the will to differentiate from the Czechs and Germans who used black eagles in their heraldries. 

Color placement 

It was also heraldry that decided on color placement. Following the principles of heraldry, knights who carried banners with their lieges’ colors placed the figure color in the top field and the background color in any other field. Red had no uniform shade in those days which was the result of using various dyes. Gradually, however, its most expensive shade, crimson, was becoming increasingly popular and from the 16th century the Polish national colors were white and crimson.

The crimson 

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, one more color, navy blue, joined the two. It was inspired by two  completely separate origins. The first one was the Polish uniform, as in the 16th century the uniforms of the Hussars and Petyhorcy (Polish and Lituanian medium-armored cavalry) in crimson and navy blue were more and more common. After the reform of 1775 and substituting the old mounted units with a uniform national cavalry, crimson and navy blue uniforms with white elements were used. Chevau-légers and other units also wore uniforms in these colors. The other origin was the Kościuszko Uprising. The fact that adding navy blue to the white and red was not a reference to the Polish uniform but to the French revolution. Kościuszko, in fact, had hoped for French support and spoke about it with Gen. Charles Dumouries, hence the reference to the French tricolor.

Color unification 

In 1831, a decision was taken to unify the colors. There were three proposals: traditional white and crimson; white, red, and navy blue supported by the Patriots Club (Towarzystwo Patriotyczne) as those had been the colors of the Bar Confederation; and white put forward by conservatives and monarchists. It needs to be explained that white, although not accepted as the national color, was lobbied by Augustus II the Strong, whereas the conservatives proposal was associated with passing the throne of Duchy of Warsaw to Wettins. During the November Uprising, the Sejm (the Polish Parliament of that time) issued the resolution of February 7th, whereby white and crimson were recognized as the Polish national colors, in reference to the colors of the Kingdom of Poland and Grand Duchy of Lithuania. However, that did not mean abandoning the remaining configurations and during the November Uprising white-red-and-blue flags were also used.

Colors and coat of arms 

After regaining independence, the Sejm passed an act on August 1st, 1919, whereby the national colors and coat of arms were formalized. The issue of the shade of red to use on the national flag arose again. It was established in 1921 that it would be crimson. Six years later, however, it was changed to vermilion. It was also formalized as vermilion by an act in 1955. It was in 1980, when the Sejm of the Polish People’s Republic decided on returning to crimson. Ever since then, the flag has remained unchanged.

POLSKA PRODUKCJA

Nasze ubrania szyjemy w Polsce. To dla nas bardzo ważne.
Wszystkie komponenty, z których powstają produkty RED IS BAD, są wytwarzane w naszym kraju. Dzianina, metki, suwaki, skórki, sznurki, naszywki... - to wszystko robimy u nas. Z przyjemnością odkrywamy potencjał rodzimych, często drobnych zakładów, które przetrwały trudne czasy komunizmu oraz lat 90-tych i wciąż są w stanie dostarczać produkty najwyższej klasy.
Z dumą możemy powiedzieć: Polska produkcja. Polska jakość.

Tabela rozmiarów
Rozmiar 2xs xs s m l xl 2xl
Szerokość pod pachami 80 84 88 92 96 100 106
Długość 62 66 70 74 78 82 88
Biodra 86 90 94 98 102 106 112
Wartości w centymetrach Tolerancja +/- 1,5 cm
Wysyłka Zwroty i wymiany
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